OUR RESEARCH

Scroll over any of the studies for a brief description and click to read more about the background, methods, and findings

The New Jersey Department of Health supported a joint research team from PiR2, the Institute for Families at Rutgers University School of Social Work, the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, and Center for Disaster and Risk Analysis at Colorado State University to conduct the 1,000-household Sandy Child and Family Health Study, a representative population study of the hurricane’s effect on the population of New Jersey, one of the largest disaster recovery projects and assessments in the region.  

THE SANDY CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH STUDY

The Gulf Coast Child and Family Health (G-CAFH) study is a longitudinal cohort study of Katrina survivors. Six months following Hurricane Katrina, David Abramson, then at  the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, partnered with the Children’s Health Fund to conduct a household survey of the health and well-being of 1,079 randomly sampled households in Louisiana and Mississippi. Four rounds of data were collected at Columbia University between 2006 - 2010.

THE GULF COAST CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH STUDY

THE GULF COAST POPULATION IMPACT STUDY

The Gulf Coast Population Impact Project was a 4-phase project that conducted two cross-sectional studies across three years. In 2010, led by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University’s Earth Institute in partnership with the Children’s Health Fund, 1,203 adult residents living in Louisiana and Mississippi within 10 miles of the coastline were interviewed by telephone through the Marist Poll. In 2012, 1,437 households were interviewed in- person across Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas with funding from the Baton Rouge Area Foundation.

Katrina@10 is an NIH-funded center grant which leverages three longitudinal cohorts, including the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health Study. Researchers at Tulane University, Harvard University, and New York University are presently exploring population recovery a decade after Hurricane Katrina. 

KATRINA

AT 10

The Women and Their Children’s Health (WaTCH) study,  funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, examines the health effects of the Gulf Coast Oil Spill on families living along the Gulf Coast with a focus on identifying factors that increase resilience. Louisiana State University faculty Dr. Ed Peters and Ed Trapido are the principal investigators, and NYU faculty member David Abramson is the principal investigator of the children’s portion of the study.  

WOMEN AND THEIR CHILDREN'S HEALTH STUDY 

Our team has conducted three studies assessing the risk communication and perception around the Zika virus:

 

  • Zika Risk Salience and Evolving Risk Communication Challenges

  • The Zika Women’s Panel Study

  • The Zika Provider Study

More information to come. 

STUDIES ON ZIKA

RAPID BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ASSESSMENT PROJECT

In response to the number of natural disasters that have occurred this year, our team has begun work with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists to develop a health behavioral module that can be used anywhere in the country after any disaster event.