THE GULF COAST CHILD AND FAMILY HEALTH STUDY

Six months following Hurricane Katrina, the PiR  team, in collaboration with Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the Children’s Health Fund’s Operation Assist conducted a random household survey of the health and well-being of 1,079 randomly selected households along Louisiana and Mississippi’s gulf coast.

This year, we are completing our fifth wave of data collection on this population, as part of the Katrina at 10 study, making the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health Study one of the largest longitudinal disaster studies ever.  Read about all the work we have done below. 

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OVERVIEW

The Gulf Coast Child and Family Health Study (G-CAFH) is a longitudinal study of post-disaster recovery measures in the Mississippi and Louisiana Gulf Coast. Established in 2006, the cohort is comprised of 1,079 randomly selected households sampled from FEMA trailer parks, commercial trailer parks, and community venues. Initially, the study was comprised of 555 Louisiana households that had been displaced or severely impacted by the disaster. Shortly thereafter, the study was replicated in 524 households along Mississippi’s Gulf Coast. 

METHODS

This sample for this study was representative of a displaced and highly-affected population. Click the links below to read more about the methodology employed for this study. 

KEY FINDINGS

Click the arrows to read through the findings of GCAFH