COURSES

Disasters,  whether  natural,  technological,  or  man-made,  reveal  how  much  our  health  and  well-being  is  dependent  upon  numerous  complex  systems  in  our  lives. These  systems  can  range  from  our  internal  cellular  and  micro-biological  systems;  through  social  and  cultural  systems;  to  public  health  and  medical  systems;  to  critical  infrastructure  and  lifeline  systems;  to  larger  environmental  and  ecological  systems,  among  others. Based  upon  a  case  study  approach,  this  course  will  explore  issues  of  risk,  vulnerability,  and  resilience. The  cases include  a  broad  range  of  domestic  and  international  disasters,  including  Hurricanes  Katrina  and  Sandy;  the  Tohoku  tsunami,  earthquake  and  nuclear  meltdown;  the  Joplin,  Missouri  tornado,  and  pandemics  such  as  SARS. The  course  reviews  contemporary  theories,  frameworks  and  methods  for  understanding  disasters  and  their  relationship  to  population  health.

DISASTERS,

COMPLEX SYSTEMS, and the SOCIAL ECOLOGY OF HEALTH

This  course contrasts  US  and  international  approaches  to  public  health  emergency  preparedness  and  response. Rotating  among  different  sites  within  NYU’s  Global  Network,  the  course  focuses  on  the  aspects  of  global  public  health  emergency  response  systems  germane  to  the  host  country. The  planned  upcoming  emergency  preparedness  course  in  Israel  take  place  during  the  January-term,  2016. The  course  focuses  on  the  planning  and  deployment  of  international  humanitarian  aid  missions,  preparedness  and  response  to  terrorism, public  health  ethical  issues  that  arise  in  conflict  situations,  and  disaster  mental  health  and  community  resilience. Students  will  also  attend  the  third  International  Preparedness  and  Response  to  Disaster  Conference  in  Tel  Aviv,  meet  with  leading  disaster  scholars  and  practitioners,  and  participate  in  a  national  emergency  drill.

PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS and RESPONSE - A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE